Author Archive

Marines in Panama, 1903-04 (Part I)

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

Arguably, the most important action President Theodore Roosevelt ever took in foreign affairs related to the construction of the Panama Canal.  It was controversial abroad —it was controversial at home.  Those who opposed the canal claimed that Roosevelt’s actions were unconstitutional.  If true, then so too were Thomas Jefferson’s actions when he acquired the Louisiana Territory.  At different times, the congressional do-nothings accused Roosevelt of usurping their authority. They must not have known ...

Continue Reading →
0

The Twiggs-Myers Family, Part III

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

Marion Twiggs, the daughter of Major General David E. Twiggs, married a young Army officer named Abraham Charles Myers, from Georgetown, South Carolina.  Myers was born on 14 May 1811, the son of Abraham Myers, a practicing attorney.  Myers was accepted into the US Military Academy at West Point in 1828 but was held back at the end of his first year due to deficiencies in his studies.  He graduated with the class of 1833.  Upon graduation, ...

Continue Reading →
0

The Error of Our Ways

Posted by:

BUNKERVILLE | God, Guns and Guts Comrades! by Mustang

At the end of World War II, Harry S. Truman was looking for ways to switch the United States from its war-time economy to one better suited to a society that wanted —and needed peace.  Unhappily, the President’s cost-cutting measures involved a one-third reduction of the military services: Army, Navy, and Marines.  Washington, D. C. was a busy place between 1945-1950:

  • World War II veterans were expeditiously discharged
  • The Department of War was transformed into ...
Continue Reading →
0

Doris Miller, the ‘negro messboy’ who became an American hero

Posted by:

I ran across this story of a “Negro” mess attendant by the name of Doris Miller.  Besides being noticeably Black, “Dorie” as known to his shipmates and friends more importantly is an American hero.

In 1939, Miller who enlisted in the U.S Navy as Mess Attendant, Third Class was later commended by Secretary of the Navy, advanced to Mess Attendant, Second Class and First Class, and was eventually promoted to Cook, Third Class.

Navy History and Heritage Command (excerpt)

Following training at ...

Continue Reading →
0

The Battle of Rorke’s Drift

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

It was the greatest stand in British military history.

Frederic Augustus Thesiger, Second Baron Chelmsford, was promoted to major general in March 1877, and appointed to command British forces in South Africa with the temporary rank of lieutenant general in February 1878. In January of 1889, Henry Bartle Frere [1], a personal friend of Thesiger, engineered a war against the Zulu nation, then led by King Cetshwayo, previously a associate of the British Empire by ...

Continue Reading →
0

Send in the Marines!

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

The United States’ first interest in China was demonstrated in 1784 when an American flagged merchant ship departed from New York bound for Canton, China. Denied access to British markets, which, given the number of ports then controlled by Great Britain, had a stifling effect on an emerging American economy.  Americans went to China looking for new markets to buy goods.  They were well received by the Chinese, and in fact some historians have suggested that the ...

Continue Reading →
0

A Western Dragoon

Posted by:

Old West Tales by Mustang

Owing to his participation in the civilization of the American West, I have mentioned James Henry Carleton on several occasions —usually as a backdrop to conflicts with American Indians— as a senior in the chain of command.  I thought for this week it would be interesting to take a closer look at this distinguished military officer.

Carleton was born in Lubec, Maine on 27 December 1814, the son of John and Abigail (Phelps) Carleton.  John was a sea captain, ...

Continue Reading →
0

At Tripoli —Part II

Posted by:

Fix Bahyonets! by Mustang

It is hard to imagine how the Barbary States (Morocco, Tunisia, Tripoli, and Algiers) might have competed with European nations at the end of the 18th Century, and at the beginning of the next. What did they have to trade that anyone wanted? Well, the Berbers did have the sea and what might be caught in it, and they also had sleek corsairs capable to running across the waves at a fast clip, overtaking merchantmen whose holds ...

Continue Reading →
0

At Tripoli —Part I

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

The opening line of the Marine Corps Hymn is, “From the Halls of Montezuma, To the Shores of Tripoli…” Whoever wrote the hymn has these events out of sequence, but I’ve tried it the other way around and it simply doesn’t work —so we will have to acknowledge some poetic license and I vote we keep the hymn the way it is now.

The brevity of the refrain leads people to think that at some point, Marines ...

Continue Reading →
0

Troops to Teachers program helps veterans become educators

Posted by:

America’s educational system will always be in need of good teachers so why not present the opportunity to our veterans from all branches of government. They have much to offer.

AF.Mil by Airman 1st Class Emily Woodring , 88th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio (AFNS) — If you’ve ever considered becoming a teacher after your military career, then the Airman and Family Readiness Center has a program they can get you connected with.

The Troops to Teachers program began ...

Continue Reading →
0
Page 1 of 4 1234
UA-115611538-1