Military Actions Prior to 1900

The Twiggs-Myers Family, Part III

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

Marion Twiggs, the daughter of Major General David E. Twiggs, married a young Army officer named Abraham Charles Myers, from Georgetown, South Carolina.  Myers was born on 14 May 1811, the son of Abraham Myers, a practicing attorney.  Myers was accepted into the US Military Academy at West Point in 1828 but was held back at the end of his first year due to deficiencies in his studies.  He graduated with the class of 1833.  Upon graduation, ...

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Military History Poster- Great Bulgarian Battles: Shipka, Dobre Pole, Liberation

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25 x 17 on better paper board, probably 1980s, two famous battles, one in Bulgarian freedom history (on left) Shipka, against the Turks, alongside Imperial Russian forces, who helped in freeing Bulgaria from Ottoman yoke, 1876, and Dobre Pole, fought in Serbia by Bulgarian Army in 1917, where Bulgarian forces held out until all were killed, flanking an artwork of an unknown (to me) general kissing the Bulgarian flag, probably upon Liberation in 1876.

  Very good.

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The Meaning and History of Molon Labe

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(Reprinted from “Bearing Arms.com”, Mar 23, 2019, Author: Tom Knighton)

 

Photo via Pixabay

If there’s one phrase that’s ubiquitous throughout the firearm community, it may well be the words “Molon Labe.”

The phrase adorns stickers, rifles, and more than a few tattoos among the pro-gun crowd. However, it also seems that a number of people aren’t really familiar with the history of the phrase nor what it represents.

To get to the origins, we have to go a little ways back in history. In particular, back ...

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The Battle of Rorke’s Drift

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

It was the greatest stand in British military history.

Frederic Augustus Thesiger, Second Baron Chelmsford, was promoted to major general in March 1877, and appointed to command British forces in South Africa with the temporary rank of lieutenant general in February 1878. In January of 1889, Henry Bartle Frere [1], a personal friend of Thesiger, engineered a war against the Zulu nation, then led by King Cetshwayo, previously a associate of the British Empire by ...

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Send in the Marines!

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

The United States’ first interest in China was demonstrated in 1784 when an American flagged merchant ship departed from New York bound for Canton, China. Denied access to British markets, which, given the number of ports then controlled by Great Britain, had a stifling effect on an emerging American economy.  Americans went to China looking for new markets to buy goods.  They were well received by the Chinese, and in fact some historians have suggested that the ...

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At Tripoli —Part II

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Fix Bahyonets! by Mustang

It is hard to imagine how the Barbary States (Morocco, Tunisia, Tripoli, and Algiers) might have competed with European nations at the end of the 18th Century, and at the beginning of the next. What did they have to trade that anyone wanted? Well, the Berbers did have the sea and what might be caught in it, and they also had sleek corsairs capable to running across the waves at a fast clip, overtaking merchantmen whose holds ...

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At Tripoli —Part I

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

The opening line of the Marine Corps Hymn is, “From the Halls of Montezuma, To the Shores of Tripoli…” Whoever wrote the hymn has these events out of sequence, but I’ve tried it the other way around and it simply doesn’t work —so we will have to acknowledge some poetic license and I vote we keep the hymn the way it is now.

The brevity of the refrain leads people to think that at some point, Marines ...

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An Age of Patriotism

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

William Ward Burrows (16 Jan 1758 – 6 March 1805) was born in Charleston, South Carolina.  He served with distinction in the Revolutionary War with the South Carolina state militia.  After the war, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to practice law.  On the day following an act of Congress to establish a permanent United States Marine Corps (11 July 1798), President John Adams appointed Burrows Major Commandant.  During his tenure as Commandant, the manpower strength of ...

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The Marines’ First Amphibious Raid

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Fix Bayonets by Mustang

At the outset of the American Revolution, Great Britain’s governor in Virginia recognized that stores of arms and gunpowder within his control were now threatened by colonial rebels.  Accordingly, he directed that these stores be removed from Virginia and transported to New Providence Island in the Bahamas.  In August 1775, General Gage [1] alerted Governor Montfort ...

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CATALOGUE OF MUSIC and FILM

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An Angel’s Kiss Theme from Unified Patriots (ALL WARS)

That Fatal Glass of Beer, WC Fields, 1933 (BEER TENT)

Green Fields of France, by The Furys and Davey Arthur (WWI)

George Jones, Honky Tonk Song

Erick Strickland and the B Sides, Haggard & Hell

Chris Scruggs, Honky Tonkin’s Lifestyle

Guy Clark, Randall Knife (Live)

Texas Rangers, our First Border Guards (Pre-1900)

Final Battle at Rorke’s Drift, from “Zulu”, 1964 (KIPLING’S BRITISH)

Roger Moore Reads Kipling’s “Tommy Adkins” (KIPLING’S BRITISH)

Madeline Kahn, I’m ...

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