Readers’ Tales

A Western Dragoon

Posted by:

Old West Tales by Mustang

Owing to his participation in the civilization of the American West, I have mentioned James Henry Carleton on several occasions —usually as a backdrop to conflicts with American Indians— as a senior in the chain of command.  I thought for this week it would be interesting to take a closer look at this distinguished military officer.

Carleton was born in Lubec, Maine on 27 December 1814, the son of John and Abigail (Phelps) Carleton.  John was a sea captain, ...

Continue Reading →
0

Save One For Hachioji

Posted by:

When my family and I first came to Japan, in Spring,1972, we flew on an American contract airline, via Honolulu and Wake Island, from Travis AFB, California.

We arrived at Yokota AFB in the northeast outskirts of greater Tokyo at night. An Army staff car and driver picked us up and took us the two and a half hour trip to Camp Zama, the old Japanese Army military academy grounds, and dropped us off at a BOQ, where we would stay ...

Continue Reading →
1

P-51 Mustang

Posted by:

(From our friend, Mike Collins, who loves ythese stories as much as we do,)

This 1967 true story is of an experience by a young 12 year old lad in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.  It is about the vivid memory of a privately rebuilt P-51 from WWII and its famous owner/pilot. 

In the morning sun, I could not believe my eyes.  There, in our little airport, sat a majestic P-51.  They said it ...

Continue Reading →
0

At Tripoli —Part II

Posted by:

Fix Bahyonets! by Mustang

It is hard to imagine how the Barbary States (Morocco, Tunisia, Tripoli, and Algiers) might have competed with European nations at the end of the 18th Century, and at the beginning of the next. What did they have to trade that anyone wanted? Well, the Berbers did have the sea and what might be caught in it, and they also had sleek corsairs capable to running across the waves at a fast clip, overtaking merchantmen whose holds ...

Continue Reading →
0

The First Lecture: First Principles of Being American (Updated)

Posted by:

“Can you tell me how many nations…in the History of the World…have sent armies, and sacrificed their men’s lives, to rescue the people of other countries?”

16-17 year-old kids are a tough room in any generation. That’s because every generation is different, so you never know what you’re going to get when you meet them as a group. They are often very smart but also skeptical about older people who try to tell things they don’t know, unless presented to them under special circumstances.

A classroom is one of ...

Continue Reading →
1

Instruction Page for Veterans’ Lecture Series

Posted by:

These lectures are free. Print out and use as you please.

We’re putting these out into the public domain, as it will help get these lectures in front of the several veterans groups, civic organizations and interested school-parent groups.

If you’ve got a knack, and itch to teach young minds, and would like to make some spare cash a few nights a month, simply use at your pleasure.

It would be nice, but you don’t even have to say you’re part of our ...

Continue Reading →
2

At Tripoli —Part I

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

The opening line of the Marine Corps Hymn is, “From the Halls of Montezuma, To the Shores of Tripoli…” Whoever wrote the hymn has these events out of sequence, but I’ve tried it the other way around and it simply doesn’t work —so we will have to acknowledge some poetic license and I vote we keep the hymn the way it is now.

The brevity of the refrain leads people to think that at some point, Marines ...

Continue Reading →
0

Troops to Teachers program helps veterans become educators

Posted by:

America’s educational system will always be in need of good teachers so why not present the opportunity to our veterans from all branches of government. They have much to offer.

AF.Mil by Airman 1st Class Emily Woodring , 88th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio (AFNS) — If you’ve ever considered becoming a teacher after your military career, then the Airman and Family Readiness Center has a program they can get you connected with.

The Troops to Teachers program began ...

Continue Reading →
0

Fish and Chips

Posted by:

Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

(The First Battle of Fallujah)

Marines abhor urban warfare more than any other form of combat.  Urban settings negate the advantages of overwhelming firepower, limit the maneuvering ability of troops, and reduce fields of observation and fires. The presence of innocent civilians, the ability of enemy forces to dress themselves as civilians and infiltrate civilian populations makes urban ...

Continue Reading →
0
Page 1 of 15 12345...»