Marines

U. S. Marines in Urban Warfare

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

Urban areas (cities and large towns), are important centers of gravity —points of interest that involve a complex range of human activities.  Throughout history military commanders have acknowledged that urban areas are either places that require protection, or they are centers that demand firm control.  These are mankind’s centers of population, transportation and communications hubs, seats of government, the sources of national wealth, and concentrations of industry.  Over the past three-hundred years, humans living in agrarian areas ...

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Marines in Panama, 1903-04 (Part II)

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

But what most people do not know …

On 18 December 1903, Secretary of the Navy William Moody directed the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Brigadier General George F. Elliott [1], to personally report to the President of the United States.  His orders from President Roosevelt were to proceed in person, taking passage aboard USS Dixie, from League Island to Colón, Panama.  Take command of the entire force of United States Marines and seamen that is ...

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Marines in Panama, 1903-04 (Part I)

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

Arguably, the most important action President Theodore Roosevelt ever took in foreign affairs related to the construction of the Panama Canal.  It was controversial abroad —it was controversial at home.  Those who opposed the canal claimed that Roosevelt’s actions were unconstitutional.  If true, then so too were Thomas Jefferson’s actions when he acquired the Louisiana Territory.  At different times, the congressional do-nothings accused Roosevelt of usurping their authority. They must not have known ...

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By an Angel’s Kiss, SSG Chrisopher Slutman, 43, SGT Benjamin Hines, 31, CPL Robert Hendrik, 25, US Marine Reserves (Afghanistan)

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Kissed by an Angel, Where Violins are the Angels’ Voices, and the Cello Sings Harmony

USMC Reserve SSG Christopher A Slutman, 43, of Newark, NJ, and

USMC Reserve SGT Benjamin S Hines, 31, of York, PA

USMC Reserve CPL Robert A Hendrik, 25, of Locust Valley, NY

were killed near Bagram AFB, Aghanistan when the vehicle they were riding in was blown up ...

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Tootsie Rolls and “The Chosin Few”

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From our friend Mike Collins and his pals:

(Note: My wife’s uncle Phillip was one of those Marines. Her father was oder and served on a tin can in the Phillipine Sea but saw no real action. He always looked up to his baby brother as the real combat hero of the family.)

The 68th Anniversary of the Korean War “Chosin Few”…..The Tootsie Roll Marines

On November 26, 1950, 10,000 men of the First Marine Division, along with elements of two ...

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Send in the Marines!

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

The United States’ first interest in China was demonstrated in 1784 when an American flagged merchant ship departed from New York bound for Canton, China. Denied access to British markets, which, given the number of ports then controlled by Great Britain, had a stifling effect on an emerging American economy.  Americans went to China looking for new markets to buy goods.  They were well received by the Chinese, and in fact some historians have suggested that the ...

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At Tripoli —Part II

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Fix Bahyonets! by Mustang

It is hard to imagine how the Barbary States (Morocco, Tunisia, Tripoli, and Algiers) might have competed with European nations at the end of the 18th Century, and at the beginning of the next. What did they have to trade that anyone wanted? Well, the Berbers did have the sea and what might be caught in it, and they also had sleek corsairs capable to running across the waves at a fast clip, overtaking merchantmen whose holds ...

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Fish and Chips

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

(The First Battle of Fallujah)

Marines abhor urban warfare more than any other form of combat.  Urban settings negate the advantages of overwhelming firepower, limit the maneuvering ability of troops, and reduce fields of observation and fires. The presence of innocent civilians, the ability of enemy forces to dress themselves as civilians and infiltrate civilian populations makes urban ...

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An Age of Patriotism

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Fix Bayonets! by Mustang

William Ward Burrows (16 Jan 1758 – 6 March 1805) was born in Charleston, South Carolina.  He served with distinction in the Revolutionary War with the South Carolina state militia.  After the war, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to practice law.  On the day following an act of Congress to establish a permanent United States Marine Corps (11 July 1798), President John Adams appointed Burrows Major Commandant.  During his tenure as Commandant, the manpower strength of ...

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