WWII

To Those Who Also Served by Staying Home and Waiting

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I just saw a memorial by a lady whose 98- year old mother had just passed, a young 24 year old, with a baby, when her husband shipped out.

My own mother passed away two years ago, age 94, and when my dad shipped, she was pregnant with my sister. She was nearly three before he could get back to see her. (They didn’t have home leaves during that war.)

Jo Stafford, who you probably never heard of, had the finest voice ...

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D-Day 74: Jumping to Honor Greatest Generation

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[Feature photo by: Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Baldock]

Defense Visual Information Distribution Service by U.S. Army Europe

SAINTE-MERE-EGLISE, France – More than 500 U.S., French, Dutch, Romanian and German paratroopers jumped from nine U.S., French, Dutch and German C-130s and C-160s during a commemorative airborne operation near here June 3 to pay tribute to D-Day veterans who demonstrated the selfless service and sacrifice characteristic of the Greatest Generation.

Following the flight path of June 6, 1944, aircraft dropped 60 paratroopers per pass, with ...

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Bachelor’s Corner on Memorial Day Sunday

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Bet you didn’t know it was called Decoration Day for close to a 100 years before it was a national holiday (1971), but the government gave the unions and working folks a day off on Monday, so as to keep them at the beach, full of beer, instead of in church. Since  Decoration Day was always on Sunday fewer showed up.

Because the 9/11 wars aren’t over, we don’t yet have a name for those wars, or a national monument for our dead or their ...

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Restored B-17F “The Memphis Belle” Unveiled on 75th Anniversary of Final Mission.

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Several days ago, the National Museum of the U. S. Air Force unveiled an exhibit of the original B-17F Memphis Belle, “exactly 75 years after its crew finished their last mission in the war against Nazi Germany on May 17, 1943.”  The Memphis Belle, had not been on public display since 2002 and will go on “permanent exhibit in the facility’s World War Two Gallery.” 

National Museum of the U. S. Air Force:

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My 60-Year Affair With The World’s Oldest Profession; Betty, Part I

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Allen’s Airborne enlistment poster (Skit Nite) is an art form I never get tired of admiring, especially leggy women. It also put me in mind of a story that’s been dancing around in my head for a long time. It actually started on a military note, World War II, well sort of, then swerved way back to Mexico, then back to the Army and Korea, then ending up in Russia and the Balkans, with short stops in a host of other countries.

And it was ...

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A Story about Meeting the Commander of PT-109, as told to me

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(This story was provided to me by the son of a man who skippered an 85-foot Rescue Boat, an extended modification of the famous PT Boat. He was one of the early sponsors of this site, and goes only by the name “Proud American”.

(There were various sizes of Rescue Boats, the majority 63-footers. And only 2260 servicemen served, so a rare treat indeed to be able to remember this service. They are collectively remembered at Continue Reading →

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The Flying Prostitute, The Martin B-26 Bomber

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An introduction to a line of stories about the world’s oldest profession and its relationship with military men every where.

The Martin B-26 was a 2-engine medium bomber, serving from 1942 to 1945. It llargely supported ground operations in the Pacific and Mediterranean theaters of combat.

Because of its huge fuselage and, by comparison, smaller wings, it was affectionately referred to by ground troops in North Africa, Sicily and Italy as “the flying prostitute”.

Why? Wait for it.

No Visible Means of Support.

 

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