WWII

After Hitler, Is Europe Returning to Type?

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“After Hitler” is a 2-part video documentary series about Europe in the five years immediately following World War II, 1945-1949. Each episode is roughly 43 minutes and was produced in 2016 but has the unmistakable feel of a 1940s news reel, although theatres rarely showed newsreels in color.

This is a MUST-SEE, for every generation since it will show you things no book you could read could convey

And especially, for everyone of any age who is watching Europe unravel today, for this offers some context as to ...

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“Send Me”, Isaiah, Chapter 6

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If you haven’t seen “Fury”, it’s an Alamo-type story of a WWII tank crew sent to hold a crossroads to protect against a German counterattack. The other tanks in their team were destroyed along the way, and theirs, “Fury”, had broken down having lost a track.

When an SS battalion was spied marching up the road, instead of heading to the boondocks, they decide to stay and hold the crossroads.

It’s a battle royale.

This scene is just before the battle begins, as they sit ...

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The Death of Ernie Pyle’s Captain Wascow, the Film Version 1945

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William Wellman was an Academy Award-winning Hollywood director, especially of some of the most memorable westerns and war classics, A Star is Born, Beau Geste (Gary Cooper) Ox-Bow Incident (Henry Fonda) Battleground (Van Johnson) Across the Wide Missouri (Clark Gable) High and the Mighty and Blood Alley (John Wayne) Darby’s Rangers (James Garner.)

In 1945 he directed “The Story of G I Joe” based on the published story by Ernie Pyle “The Death of Captain Wascow”, 1944, a much-loved-by-his-troops company commander, Henry Wascow, who was ...

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The Magic Carpet That Brought Everybody Home – WWII

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(Courtesy of our Vietnam War combat vet, Mike Collins, this is how my Dad got home in ’45.)

The U.S. military experienced an unimaginable increase during World War II. In 1939, there were 334,000
servicemen, not counting the Coast Guard. In 1945, there
were over 12 million, including the Coast Guard. At the
end of the war, over 8 million of these men and women
were scattered overseas in Europe, the Pacific and Asia.
Shipping them out wasn’t a particular problem ...

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To Those Who Also Served by Staying Home and Waiting

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I just saw a memorial by a lady whose 98- year old mother had just passed, a young 24 year old, with a baby, when her husband shipped out.

My own mother passed away two years ago, age 94, and when my dad shipped, she was pregnant with my sister. She was nearly three before he could get back to see her. (They didn’t have home leaves during that war.)

Jo Stafford, who you probably never heard of, had the finest voice ...

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